Burger King made a video extolling the virtues of net neutrality

Millennials, by a large margin, favor net neutrality and oppose President Donald Trump’s successful push to overturn those regulations. Millennials also have a tendency to ignore fast food stalwarts, in favor of more luxury fare, like avocado toast.

So, what is a long-respected fast food chain like Burger King supposed to do in order to lure in that fickle younger generation? Make a video explaining net neutrality to the masses, using a Whopper sandwich as a stand-in for the potential fast and slow lanes that an unregulated Internet could produce?

Burger King – Whopper Neutrality video

That’s exactly what they did. Burger King made a video extolling the virtues of net neutrality by setting up a hidden camera in one of their franchise locations and pretending that customers could only order Whoppers using the kinds of fast lanes and slow lanes Internet users fear will begin clogging up the web in the coming years.

A Whopper ordered via the slow lane would only cost $4.79, but would take “15-20 minutes” to arrive, while one ordered in the fastest lane would be prepared immediately, costing a whopping $25.99, much to the chagrin of the customers.

“I didn’t think ordering a Whopper would really open my eyes to net neutrality,” one customer said at the end of the video.

This is actually a pretty bold marketing move. Burger King, after all, has no skin in the telecommunications game, so they may as well throw their weight behind a movement that is largely embraced by the younger generations.

Fernando Machado, their global chief marketing officer, explained the reasoning behind the spot in a press release.

“We believe the internet should be like Burger King restaurants, a place that doesn’t prioritize and welcomes everyone,” he wrote. “That is why we created this experiment, to call attention to the potential effects of net neutrality.”

As of this writing, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and viral plagiarizer Benny Johnson have not come together for another video collaboration, in which they pour Tide Pods all over Whoppers to show that you will still be able to meme and eat fast food after the regulations are removed, or something.

Burger King made a video extolling the virtues of net neutrality
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